A young goose that was found injured at Bailey Park in Battle Creek is back in the wild and lucky to be alive. On Sunday, the juvenile aged bird was discovered with fishing line cutting off circulation to one of its legs. Michael Blair and Sophia DiPietro, who are the directors of All Species Kinship (A.S.K.), routinely visit city parks to check waterfowl conditions as these are places where they often find injured birds due to litter. This was exactly the case Sunday.

(Courtesy All Species Kinship A.S.K.)

The bird was fortunate for several reasons. One is simply that they were doing the routine check when they were. Another is that even though the fishing line had cut into the birds leg, the injuries were caught early enough that the goose will best heal back in the wild and didn't need to be taken to a clinic for rehabilitation.

(Courtesy All Species Kinship A.S.K.)
(Courtesy All Species Kinship A.S.K.)

Sophia, who is also a wildlife biologist, says the most common ailments to wildlife at parks is due to stray fishing lines and hooks. When at all possible, anglers should try to retrieve any snagged lines, lures or hooks, along with any other items used in fishing, to prevent injuries to other wildlife near waterways. And anyone visiting local parks should make sure to put garbage where it belongs and to leave with anything else you brought with you. If you come across an injured bird of any type should contact an experienced bird expert so they can determine the best course of action. Do not try to determine on your own if the bird is healthy enough to be released.

All Species Kinship (A.S.K.) also reminds park goers to check out new educational signage that has been installed at Bailey Park and Irving Park warning of the risks associated with feeding waterfowl. Although it can be a fun activity for children, feeding bread to birds can cause some deficiencies in their nutrition and also lead to unnaturally high populations in concentrated areas.

(Courtesy All Species Kinship A.S.K.)