It’s been said that, sadly, by 2050 more than half of the individuals 65 and older are expected to be affected with Alzheimer’s. We all have what we sometimes refer to as “senior moments” where we forget things, but forgetting names or appointments and then remembering them later may just mean that you have when do you know that it might be more serious?   Keli Carter of the Laurels of Bedford was a recent guest on the 95.3 WBCK Morning Show with Tim Collins.   During the "Miles for Memories" segment, she reminded listeners that we all have times where there are just too many things on our mind or may just a part of natural aging.  But if it happens more and more often, and if you or a loved one are concerned about memory lapses, you should talk to your doctor about testing.

Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. There are many warning signs and symptoms, and every individual may experience one or more of these signs in different degrees simply as a side effect ofnatural aging.  But memory loss that disrupts daily life is, generally, one of the most common signs of Alzheimer’s.

Are there warning signs that we should be looking for?

  • Forgetting recently learned information

Not remembering that their grandchild just had a baby

Not remembering the loss of a loved one

Not remembering recent visits from friends or relatives

  • Forgetting important dates or events

Birthdays, anniversaries, even holidays

  • Asking for the same information over and over

What time is my appointment?

Why am I going to the doctor?

  • Increasingly needing to rely on memory aides

Writing notes or counting on family members to handle things they used to do on their own.

Carter says early detection is critical to slowing the progression of the disease.

Miles for Memories is creating solution for those impacted by dementia in Calhoun County through movement, programming and research.  For more information, visit Miles for Memories on Facebook.