In a world that makes less and less sense every day, add this to the mix: Government doctors and regulators are deciding right now if it's a good idea to allow mixing and matching booster shots. In other words, if you got the Moderna vaccine, could you get a booster of the Pfizer vaccine?

This debate is ahead of the likely approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of booster shots for both Moderna and Johnson and Johnson. But those are simple, straight-ahead, boosters, essentially one for one. If you originally got the Moderna vaccine, you'd be getting the Moderna booster, and the same goes for people vaccinated with the Johnson and Johnson vaccine. Pfizer is already approved.

But the discussion is going beyond that, according to this story on Click on Detroit. What's expected is the FDA will say, ideally, you should get a booster of the same vaccine you got first, but...researchers are finding that mixing a booster in, not from the original still gets the antibodies into fighting mode. But when Johnson and Johnson recipients got a booster of one of the other brands, things got really interesting.

"Recipients of the single-dose J&J vaccination had the most dramatic response -- a 76-fold and 35-fold jump in antibody levels, respectively, shortly after either a Moderna or Pfizer booster, compared to a four-fold rise after a second J&J shot." -Click on Detroit.

Where the discussion is, too, Moderna has applied for approval of a half dose for its booster shot. All this has to be sorted through and figured out, since people come in all sizes.

And it doesn't get any less complicated with Merck working on a Covid pill. How does that playing into this?

Get our free mobile app

Answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

Vaccinations for COVID-19 began being administered in the U.S. on Dec. 14, 2020. The quick rollout came a little more than a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed has also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from the practical—how will I get vaccinated?—to the scientific—how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to discover answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions.

LOOK: Things from the year you were born that don't exist anymore

The iconic (and at times silly) toys, technologies, and electronics have been usurped since their grand entrance, either by advances in technology or breakthroughs in common sense. See how many things on this list trigger childhood memories—and which ones were here and gone so fast you missed them entirely.