There’s a mixture of applause and jeers directed at the leadership of a northern Michigan county. The conservatively led Cheboygan County Board of Commissioners today is expected to approve a request to the state for a hand recount of the 2020 Presidential Election vote tally there. The proposed letter is included in a commission agenda package posted online.

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The county is mostly rural. It encompasses a large section of the northeast tip of the lower peninsula. The total county population is only about 26,000 according to the 2010 census.

But its size isn’t what matters. It’s what happened during the 2020 election and in particular, how Dominion Voting System machines electronically processed and tallied votes is what commissioners say really matters.

Of course, most every media outlet is joining with Democrats saying there’s nothing out of the ordinary that happened during the 2020 voting. Many conservatives are far from secure with that claim. And an increasing number are paying more attention to related issues.

The proposed audit letter that would be sent to the state includes the following text;
“As commissioners, we have heard from many of our constituents expressing concerns/questions related to the November 3, 2020 election. We believe we have a responsibility to address these concerns/questions.”

If approved by the commission, the letter will be sent to Jonathan Brater, the  Director of the Michigan Department of State Bureau of Elections. It would be his decision to allow or prevent the county from conducting the audit.

The state has already performed its own internal audit and has claimed there’s nothing wrong with any of the reported results.

But some of the questions the Cheboygan County leaders want answered have not been adequately answered, hence their request. Among the lingering issues is whether the Dominion Voting Systems elections machines were connected to the internet and had the capability to adjust vote totals.  The county leaders want a third-party audit firm to make that determination.

LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.